Home Polls I’d Rather Work With □Men □Women

I’d Rather Work With □Men □Women

Most respondents to a recent Women In Optometry Pop-up Poll said that it makes no difference to them whether they’re working with or for men or women.

The pop-up poll asked the simple question: “Would you rather work for a man or a woman?” Sixty-seven percent of nearly 150 respondents said it made no difference, but of those expressing a preference, slightly more said they would prefer to work for a woman.

The next question asked if the respondent would rather work with a men or women. The responses were similar, but the gap closed between those who preferred to work with men versus those who preferred to work with women.

Eighty-one percent of the respondents were women, and 17 percent were men; 2 percent did not specify gender. Among the women, 21 percent said they’d prefer to work for a woman, while 12 percent said they’d prefer to work for a man. The remaining 67 percent said the gender of the boss made no difference. Among women, 19 percent said they’d prefer to work with women, while 16 percent said they’d prefer to work with men; again, the majority—65 percent—said it made no difference.

Among the men, 79 percent said gender made no different, but 17 percent said they’d prefer to work for a man, while 4 percent said they’d prefer to work for a woman. However, when it comes to work colleagues, 22 percent of male respondents said they’d prefer to work with women, while 9 percent said they’d prefer to work with men. For the majority, 79 percent—gender made no difference.

Several respondents wrote in with their thoughts.

“I would just rather work with someone who shows up and doesn’t bring their personal drama into the workplace. I don’t think that that is gender-specific.”

“Women are more fair as bosses. Men are easier to work with as teammates.”

“I will not work for anyone.”

“Competence and civility matter much more than gender.”

“As a male OD, I have worked most of my career with a female MD boss and/or female MD/OD associates. Makes no difference.”

“I have worked both for and with men and women. I find men can be just as understanding as women about family issues, concerns and time off. In my experience, the women that I work with are more emotional and have less of a grasp on business and the importance business management. I like the understanding and bonding that has come with my women colleagues; however, I like the more easy-going aspect and less emotionally driven aspect of working with men ODs.”

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